How to make Moroccan Mint Tea: recipe, serving and culture

Moroccan mint tea is sweet and flavourful and served piping hot. The powerful scent of mint is to die for. After reading this post, you know how to infuse a pot of authentic Moroccan Mint tea and how to serve and savor it.

Moroccan tea set with Moroccan teapot and two tea glasses filled with mint twigs and mint tea on a tray. Mint bush on the side of the tray and a blue tea tile as a pot coaster underneath the teapot.

Family is gathered around the tea tray filled with pastries and sweets and countless tiny glasses to enjoy the tea from. The teapot and tray are shining the silvery color and Arabic decorations. It is time for the Moroccan Mint tea, which is a huge part of Moroccans’ everyday life.

The traditional Moroccan Mint Tea, the staple of Moroccan Cuisine, has only four ingredients: mint, green tea, sugar, and water. That’s it. It is easy to implement at home to enjoy this sweet and delicious hot drink with your family and friends.

Tips for making

  • Use fresh mint if you have, if you don’t dried will do just fine as well.
  • Green tea has the best flavor when infused at 75-80°C (167-176°F). If you use too hot water it creates bitterness which we don’t want to!
  • The infusion time for the green tea is short only 2-3 minutes, so use a tea sieve or ball to easily take off the green tea leaves when it’s time.
  • For the best result use loose-leaf green tea, but green tea bags will work fine too.

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FAQ

Does Moroccan mint tea have caffeine in it?

Yes. In Moroccan mint tea there is used green tea leaves and they do contain caffeine. If you want to have caffeine-free you can modify and leave the tea out.

Is Moroccan mint tea safe during pregnancy?

Yes, in reasonable amounts. In Moroccan mint tea there is used green tea which contains caffeine. During pregnancy, it is okay to drink a certain amount of green tea, though it contains caffeine. Check with your local health care for the recommended limits. Green tea varieties contain different amounts of caffeine, so turn to your local tea shop, to find one that has less caffeine if needed.

Moroccan teapot on a blue tea tile and a fabric tea mitten.

What teapot to use for Moroccan mint tea?

The best and the traditional option is the metallic, silver-colored Moroccan teapot. It is heat-proof to use on the gas stove, which is very common in Morocco. You can do it in a ceramic tea pot too with boiled water from the water boiler or in a stainless steel pot on the stove.

When using the metallic one, the whole pot heats up, so remember to use the special tea mitt that usually comes with it to not burn your hands. When you pour, hold with the other hand the black rubber part to keep the teapot lid closed.

| RELATED: Tea kettle vs teapot | How to choose and use them

Tools you may need

  • Moroccan teapot or other teapot that is heatproof to use on the stove
  • Measuring spoons
  • Tea sieve
  • Spoon for stirring
  • Small tea glasses for serving
  • Tray (optional) for tea glasses and teapot

Moroccan Mint Tea ingredients

Moroccans know the quality, especially what comes to the ingredients. The mint tea is the most common drink in Moroccan everyday life alongside coffee. Tough mint tea is mundane, it is never bad or boring when served in Morocco.

Choosing well the ingredients

Below, you find my suggestions for the ingredients to obtain the best result.

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Gunpowder Green tea

Use good quality unflavored green tea. I prefer the Chinese Temple of Heaven Gunpowder Green Tea. The name comes from the tea leaves used in it, which are rolled into tight tiny pearls. In fact, in Mandarin, they call it “pearl tea“. It is aromatic and naturally slightly sweet. The color of this rolled tea is greyish so no wonder why the English started to call it gunpowder.

NANA MINT

In Arabic nana means mint. Usually, the Moroccan spearmint is then called Nana mint. It is strong in flavor and scent and best choice for mint tea. Other mint varieties will do fine as well, taste and increase the amount if needed.

sugar

Generally in Morocco white sugar is used in the mint tea. They even have bigger blocks of sugar that melt fast in the teapot. You can choose a sweetener of your liking, but notice that some might add a different flavor to your tea. I have tried with cane sugar and it turned out great!

water

Use always fresh water for the best result.

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Hand holding a Mint bush against the wooden surface.

How to make Moroccan Mint Tea step-by-step

Measure green tea leaves into a tea sieve, or tea ball. Put the mint twigs into the teapot, and leave a few twigs for each serving glass. Spoon the sugar on the mint leaves in the teapot. Fill with water and let it simmer but not heavily boil.

Measuring gunpowder green tea with a metallic spoon from a metallic tea box.
Measure the green tea leaves. I am using the Gunpowder green tea.

Rinse rapidly the green tea sieve under the running water and place it into the teapot. Decrease the heat. Infuse the green tea for 2-3 minutes and take off the sieve. Too high a temperature and too long infusing time might cause bitter flavors. Put the teapot on a pot coaster, like our blue Moroccan tile, and place it on a tray.

Serving

Serve the tea from the Moroccan teapot right after finishing. Use a tea serving tray where you can set the glasses, teapot, and some biscuits and sweets to enjoy with the tea. Put fresh mint twigs in the glasses before serving to obtain the Moroccan style. Pour in one glass full of the tea and then pour it back into the teapot to mix the tea well before serving. Then pour everyone a glass. You can try pouring the Moroccan style and start pouring close to the rim of the glass and then lifting the teapot very high up and lowering it down to finish up the pour.

Enjoy the traditional Moroccan mint tea with some Moroccan pastries like harcha, msemen (rghaif), or some Moroccan sweets.

Storage

Enjoy the hot tea right away. If you have something left, you can sieve it into a bottle in the fridge to use as iced tea later. Keeps in the fridge for up to a week.

Little Helper

Fresh mint twigs are always fun for a toddler and child to smell and tear to smaller ones to fit into the teapot. When measuring tea leaves and sugar, use a separate cup or a small bowl so that when overmeasured, it is easy to pour back into the bag or box and start again. When you are infusing the tea on the stove let your child continue measuring to a small cup for practice.

A little girl holding a tray full of mint twigs and passing on one to a man who is reaching with the hand.

Depending on the age let the child carry the tea tray (maybe without the hot teapot) to the sofa table from the kitchen and place the mint twigs in the drinking glasses.

Try this out and let me know!

Have you tasted yet the Moroccan mint tea? Doesn’t it just taste so delicious? Let me know in the comments where you have tasted it and what you have enjoyed with it!

Moroccan tea set with Moroccan teapot and two tea glasses filled with mint twigs and mint tea on a tray. Mint bush on the side of the tray and a blue tea tile as a pot coaster underneath the teapot.

Moroccan Mint Tea

Yield: 4
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Moroccan mint tea is sweet and flavourful and served piping hot. The powerful scent of mint is to die for. With this recipe, you know how to infuse a pot of authentic Moroccan Mint tea and how to serve and savor it.

Ingredients

  • 4 twigs of mint (plus one twig for each serving glass)
  • 1 tbsp Gunpowder green tea
  • 1-2 tbsp sugar
  • 4 dl water

Instructions

  1. Measure green tea leaves into a tea sieve, or tea ball. Put the mint twigs into the teapot, and leave a few twigs for each serving glass.
  2. Spoon the sugar on the mint leaves in the teapot.
  3. Fill with water and let it simmer but not heavily boil.
  4. Rinse rapidly the green tea sieve under the running water and place it into the teapot. Decrease the heat. Infuse the green tea for 2-3 minutes and take off the sieve.
  5. Put the teapot on a pot coaster, like our blue Moroccan tile, and place it on a tray.

Serving

Serve the tea from the Moroccan teapot right after finishing. Use a tea serving tray where you can set the glasses, teapot, and some biscuits and sweets to enjoy with the tea. Put fresh mint twigs in the glasses before serving to obtain the Moroccan style. Pour in one glass full of the tea and then pour it back into the teapot to mix the tea well before serving. Then pour everyone a glass. You can try pouring the Moroccan style and start pouring close to the rim of the glass and then lifting the teapot very high up and lowering it down to finish up the pour.

Enjoy the traditional Moroccan mint tea with some Moroccan pastries like harcha, msemmen (rghaif), or some Moroccan sweets.

Storage

Enjoy the hot tea right away. If you have something left, you can sieve it into a bottle in the fridge to use as iced tea later. Keeps in the fridge for up to a week.

Notes

  • Use fresh mint if you have, if you don't dried will do just fine as well.
  • Green tea has the best flavor when infused at 75-80°C (167-176°F). If you use too hot water it creates bitterness which we don't want to!
  • The infusion time for the green tea is short only 2-3 minutes, so use a tea sieve or ball to easily take off the green tea leaves when it's time.
  • For the best result use loose-leaf green tea, but green tea bags will work fine too.
  • This recipe is for four servings, but the serving glases are so tiny, that we usually take seconds. Mind still that the drink is very sweet, so one glass might just be satisfying enough. Feel free to adjust the amount of sugar to your liking.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 4 Serving Size: 1 dl
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 32Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 10mgCarbohydrates: 8gFiber: 0gSugar: 8gProtein: 0g

Nutrition information isn’t always accurate.

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Hand pouring Mint tea from a Moroccan tea pot to the glasses with twigs of mint. Test says: Hos to do and serve Authentic Moroccan Mint Tea.

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27 Comments

  1. I love a nice, hot cup of tea on chilly winter days. Looking forward to making the Moroccan mint tea. A is sweet and flavorful tea is perfect for me!

        1. Thanks for your comment Lisa, the teapot is from Tanger, Morocco. We actually carried two of those and the cute tea glasses with us in our backpacks back to Finland!