Christmas Glogg with hibiscus (non-alcoholic)

Steaming hot Christmas glogg with incredible spices. Woollen socks on and a Glogg mug warming the hands – welcome Christmas time! Here in the north, the Scandinavian hot drink Glogg is the best way to start December. This non-alcoholic Glogg recipe gets you in the Christmas mood.

Glogg drink in the traditional glass, on the side some cinnamo0n and cloves sprinkled around.

Tips for making Christmas Glogg with hibiscus

  • If you prefer more wine-like flavours and a tannin feel, let the hibiscus petals infuse longer. To get those earthy dry red wine-like flavors you can extend up to 30-60 minutes the infusion time. On the contrary, if you prefer more subtle flavours of hibiscus you can fill your tee strainer or a straining cloth with the hibiscus before dunking in. (Just remember that hibiscus and blackcurrant will give your straining cloth a happy Christmas red colour!) Pulling the tea strainer out after 5-10 minutes of the infusion you get a lighter flavour of hibiscus, but you can leave the spices in longer – depending on your preference.
  • Make sure you choose a good unsweetened 100% blackcurrant juice or the one you have made yourself.
  • Use fresh ginger root. If you decide to use the ginger powder you might need to sieve the Glogg with a cheesecloth depending on the result you want. The same goes as well if the clovers are very smashed and falling apart sieving with the cloth might be useful if you don’t have a tiny-hole strainer.
  • Don’t be afraid of the spices. If you feel like it you can add up more or extend the infusion time to get stronger and punchier flavours.
  • In the recipe, I use brown sugar with molasses (fariinisokeri/farinsocker, a dark, moist, brown sugar product that has been added some molasses). If you don’t have it, you can substitute it with dark syrup or brown sugar but increase the amount slightly.
Ingredients prepared on a wooden surface: sliced ginger root, brown sugar with molasses, clovers and a cinnamon stick.

FAQ

What is glogg and what is the season for it?

Glogg is a Scandinavian, or better to say North European, hot drink that we most commonly associate with Christmas time. The high season for Glogg is definitely in winter. The name varies depending on the country: gløgg in Denmark and Norway, glögg in Sweden and glögi in Finland. Glogg has similarities with the German version of mulled wine called Glühwein.

Does glogg have alcohol in it?

Often glogg contains some dry, unsweet red wines like Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir or Merlot. You can make it as well with stronger alcohols such as rum or sometimes even vodka.

What flavors are in Christmas glogg?

Glogg is seasoned with some Christmas spices. Commonly you can find in Glogg some cinnamon, cloves, ginger and cardamom. Often there is added some orange peel as well. Blackcurrant juice is the prevailing choice with juices but you can also find some apple juice, grape juice and hibiscus infusion in the Glogg.

What do you eat with hot Glogg?

Gingerbread is the first option but pinwheel-shaped tarts with plum jam are good with Glogg too. You can add in your glogg some almonds and raisins as well. Some do eat them, and some just like the flavour that they add to their drink.

Is glogg always served hot?

Mainly glogg is served hot – steaming hot I would say. But there are times that I have enjoyed it with some sparkling water like a Christmas lemonade! Just dilute the strong glogg you have with some frizzy sparkling water and serve it from the flute glass – no one is stopping you from trying!

What are the benefits of a hibiscus drink?

First of all, hibiscus is full of antioxidants and it may help lower blood pressure. It may boost liver health or even fight against cancer! (Read more here).

Tools you might need

  • Stainless steel pot
  • Ladel
  • Sieve
  • Cups for serving or bottle for storing

How to make Christmas glogg

Pour water and blackcurrant juice into a pot and turn the heat on to medium-high. Measure hibiscus petals, cinnamon, cloves and brown sugar with molasses in.

Cut the thin slices of the ginger root, to maximize the flavors – no need to peel the root. Add them to the pot.

Bring the Glogg to a boil and turn the heat off. Leave the pot on the stove, close with the lid and let it infuse for about 15 minutes. If you want stronger flavors leave up to 60 minutes, depending on your preference.

Glogg simmering in a steel pot on the stove with hibiscus petals and cinnamon stick.

Hot glogg in a traditional glass, some cinnamon sticks and clovers sprinkled on the Christmas fabric and wooden cutting board.

Serving Christmas Glogg

Pour into the glasses through a strainer and serve steaming hot. You can add some raisins or almonds to the Glogg and enjoy it with baked gingerbreads. Dunking the gingerbreads in the glogg is one of the pleasures of Christmas time!

Meal prep

If you are making the Glogg ahead place a funnel into a glass jar and a strainer on the top. If you have a helper this is so much easier, if you don’t support the sieve with something with the same height – like the granola jar.

Pour the glogg in – without burning yourself with the hot liquid! Close with the lid. Let it cool on the counter on a heatproof surface before moving to the freezer.

Storage

You can store the Glogg in the fridge about for a week. If you can seal the bottle very airtight I might last a few months. As soon as it has completely cooled you can also freeze the glogg. Then when you need to, just take it out the day before to the fridge or let it melt on the counter to be enjoyed with friends.

Little Helper

Making Glogg is so easy that my two-year-old can handle it – I swear! Depending on the age, let your child measure all the things before you put the whole pot on the stove. If your child is into counting – the clovers are good practice to be counted one by one for this recipe!

One of the most amazing and interesting things that we have for a toddler in the kitchen is the scale. Let the child use the scale with your assistance. In the recipe, I have marked down the grams as well so measuring each ingredient is a perfect option for a tiny scale lover like mine.

While the glogg is simmering, let your child continue to weigh potatoes, carrots, or anything s/he finds in the kitchen.

Hot glogg in a traditional glass, some cinnamon sticks and cloves sprinkled around.

Christmas glogg with hibiscus (non alcoholic)

Yield: 4
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Additional Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes

Steaming hot Christmas Glogg with incredible spices. Woollen socks on and a Glogg mug warming the hands - welcome Christmas time! Here in the north, the Scandinavian hot drink Glogg is the best way to start December. This non-alcoholic Glogg recipe gets you in the Christmas mood.

Ingredients

  • 1 dl hibiscus petals (10g)
  • 4 dl water (390g)
  • 2 dl unsweetened blackcurrant juice
  • 60g brown sugar with molasses (fariinisokeri/farinsocker) OR substitute with 80g of brow sugar or dark syrup
  • 1-2 cinnamon stick (5g)
  • 10 cloves
  • 8g ginger root sliced

Instructions

    1. Pour water and blackcurrant juice into a pot and turn the heat on to medium-high. Measure hibiscus petals, cinnamon, cloves and brown sugar with molasses in.
    2. Cut the thin slices of the ginger root, to maximize the flavors - no need to peel the root. Add them to the pot.
    3. Bring the Glogg to a boil and turn the heat off. Leave the pot on the stove, close with the lid and let it infuse for about 15 minutes. If you want stronger flavors leave up to 60 minutes, depending on your preference.

      Serving
      Pour into the glasses through a strainer and serve steaming hot. You can add some raisins or almonds to the Glogg and enjoy it with baked gingerbreads. Dunking the gingerbreads in the Glogg is one of the pleasures of Christmas time!

      Meal prep
      If you are making the Glogg ahead place a funnel into a glass jar and a strainer on the top. If you have a helper this is so much easier, if you don't support the sieve with something with the same height - like the granola jar.

      Pour the Glogg in - without burning yourself with the hot liquid! Close with the lid.

      Storage
      You can store the Glogg in the fridge about for a week. If you can seal the bottle very airtight I might last a few months. You can freeze the Glogg when it is completely cooled. Then when needed just take it out the day before to the fridge or let it melt on the counter to be enjoyed with friends.

Notes

    • If you prefer more wine-like flavours and a tannin feel, let the hibiscus petals infuse longer. To get those earthy dry red wine-like flavors you can extend up to 30-60 minutes the infusion time. On the contrary, if you prefer more subtle flavours of hibiscus you can fill your tee strainer or a straining cloth with the hibiscus before dunking in. (Just remember that hibiscus and blackcurrant will give your straining cloth a happy Christmas red colour!) Pulling the tea strainer out after 5-10 minutes of the infusion you get a lighter flavour of hibiscus, but you can leave the spices in longer - depending on your preference.
    • Make sure you choose a good unsweetened 100% blackcurrant juice or the one you have made yourself.
    • Use fresh ginger root. If you decide to use the powder you might need to sieve the Glogg with a cheesecloth depending on the result you want. The same goes as well if the clovers are very smashed and falling apart sieving with the cloth might be useful if you don't have a tiny-hole strainer.
    • Don't be afraid of the spices. If you feel like it you can add up more or extend the infusion time to get stronger and punchier flavours.
    • In the recipe, I use brown sugar with molasses (fariinisokeri/farinsocker, a dark, moist, brown sugar product that has been added some molasses). If you don't have it, you can substitute it with dark syrup or brown sugar but increase the amount slightly.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 4 Serving Size: 160
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 462Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 64mgCarbohydrates: 119gFiber: 4gSugar: 96gProtein: 1g

Did you make this recipe?

Share and tag me @blue.tea.tile - I would love to see how it turned out ♡

Have you tried the Christmas Glogg yet ?

Have you tried yet the Christmas Glogg? Do you prefer spicier and punchier or more subtle Christmas flavours? Let me know in the comments your favourite combinations and how you like to enjoy them!

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